Giro Pivot Cycling Gloves

Manufacturer Description

A fleece insulated, waterproof glove with maximum dexterity for riding and racing in cold, wet conditions. (35° F / 2° C). The Pivot provides great insulation from cold, wet weather thanks to the combination of a Pertex waterproof, breathable soft shell upper with a Hipora waterproof membrane, and X-Static anti-microbial performance fleece core. It’s the go-to glove for riders in tough climates, cyclo-cross racers, and anyone else looking for seasonal performance without compromise.

Features

  • Silicone detailing on palm
  • Waterproof wiping surface
  • Reflective detailing on shell
  • Pertex waterproof/breathable fabric repels cold, wet weather
  • Hipora 100% waterproof construction liner
  • Clarino synthetic leather palm for maximum grip
  • Adjustable cuff to seal out cold and snow
  • Super Fit Engineered with 3-panel palm for a tailored fit
  • Measured weight – 49 g each (1.7 oz) size large
  • Retail – $70

YMMV Review

I have some experience with Giro’s summer cycling gloves. Recently, I was fortunate to have been sent some of their winter gloves to test. They sent me two pairs, the Pivot and the Ambient 2 gloves. The Pivot is the warmer of the two and has got the bulk of the rides this fall.

Reflective Elements

Testing

I have been testing these gloves, mainly on my commutes. My commute to, and from work is around 16 miles each way. This time of a year it is in the 20s on my way in and 30s on my way home.

Design ★★★½☆

Appearance (10%)★★★★☆

Construction (40%)★★★★☆

Features (30%)★★★½☆

Materials (10%)★★★☆☆

Sustainability (10%)★☆☆☆☆

The Giro Pivot Gloves are part of Giro’s new winter glove collection. The Pivot is one of the warmer options in the line with an estimated temperature rating of 2° C (35° F). They can be used for road, cyclocross, mountain, and commuting. The Pivot gloves are made with several different fabrics to create a warm, windproof, and waterproof glove. The palm is made of three panels of Clarino synthetic leather to give good grip across a variety of surfaces. Clarino is made of 52% nylon, 35% polyurethane, 10% polyester, and 3% other fibers (whatever these are). To enhance the grip Giro added silicone detailing on two of the fingers and the thumb. On the bottom outside of the palm there is a two section pad for further comfort on the bars. Due to the exterior fabrics and interior liner on these gloves, there is already some padding for the rest of the hand.

Silicone Gripper on 2 Fingers and Thumb

The backs of the gloves are made of Pertex waterproof breathable fabric. The Pertex is a mix of 85% nylon, 10% polyester, and 5% other fibers (I could not figure out what these were). Over the back of the thumb is a softer fabric for using to wipe your nose. Across the fingers, there are reflective accents. On the back of the hand, the Giro logo and accents are made of a more robust reflective material. The inner liner of the gloves is a 100% polyester fleece X-Static lining. The x-static fiber has a layer of pure silver permanently bonded to the surface of a textile fiber. X-static is antimicrobial, anti-odor, all-natural, thermodynamic, and anti-static. Between the fleece liner and the outer shell, there is a Hipora polyurethane waterproof membrane. Hipora is a waterproof breathable fabric that has been commonly used in winter and motorcycle gloves.

Around the cuff, the material is a bit stretchier with a gusset to adjust to your wrist size. The closure on the gloves is by Velcro. Under the wrist, Giro has added a grip tab for pulling the gloves on. This is a nice little extra that definitely helps get these on. The gloves really feel like they are made with quality. Unfortunately, I do not see any evidence of them being made with and sustainable materials or practices. Hopefully, they are looking for these alternatives.

Fit ★★★★☆

Comfort (30%)★★★★☆

Cuff (20%)★★★☆☆

Ease of Movement (50%)★★★★☆

Most gloves I own are a medium in size. With the Giro Pivot Gloves, I ended up testing a large as they run slightly small. In the size large the Pivot Gloves have been very comfortable. The interior liner is nice and soft against the skin, and I could not feel any of the seams in the gloves. With the gloves on I felt like I still had good dexterity in my hands, even enough to operate small zippers. The fabric on the back of the thumb is soft against the nose.

Velcro Cuff

Around the wrist, the cuff adjusts well. The stretch is adequate, and it does not feel too bulky. The Velcro is sometimes hard to get attached, but once it is it works well. Of the whole glove, the only part I was not really impressed by was the Velcro closure.

Performance ★★★½☆

Breathability (5%)★★½☆☆

Cushioning (10%)★★½☆☆

Versatility (10%)★★★½☆

Warmth (25%)★★★½☆

Water Resistance (25%)★★★★☆

Wind Resistance (25%)★★★★☆

The Giro Pivot Gloves have been a nice addition to my commuting wear this fall/winter. Most of my rides with the Pivot Gloves have been in the range of one hour. I have found that my hand will stay plenty warm to temperatures below freezing if I am working hard, but if it is an easy ride, my hand may start to get cold. Giro rates these gloves to 2° C (35° F). I would say that this rating is conservative but ultimately depends on how long your ride is and how much effort you are expending.

When I was riding hard I did notice some build-up of moisture inside the gloves. Since these are waterproofed with an internal membrane this condensation was expected. The inner fleece lining does a descent job moving some of this moisture away from your skin. There have been some recent articles about cold weather riding claiming that the moisture is actually good as it keeps you warmer. As long as it is blocked from the wind. One drawback from the moisture build-up is your hand does become harder to pull out of the gloves. It is entirely possible to pull the liner out of the fingers which is a pain. To avoid this just remove each finger separately and make sure not to pull out the liner. When putting the gloves back on it will be easier and while still difficult if the inside is clammy, the pull tab will come in especially handy.

Pad on Heel of Palm

The Giro Pivot Gloves are windproof and waterproof. The outer shell and internal membrane do a good job of keeping out all the elements. In order to keep your hands warm down to near freezing temperatures it is paramount to keep the cold air and rain/snow out. Through all my testing, I did not have any moisture or wind penetrate the gloves.

The palms of the gloves have some small padding near the heel of the palm. This helps a bit with comfort and since the glove is made of several layers, including fleece, it cushions your hands from the bar fairly well. Even with these layers the Pivot Gloves still get excellent marks for dexterity as I mentioned above. The gloves are not only a good option for cycling but would be good for other activities as well. I would not hesitate to use these for running or cross-country skiing.

Overall ★★★½☆

Overall, I have been impressed by the Giro Pivot Gloves. Not only have they kept my hands warm, but they also have good dexterity doing it. Here is Bend, there are definitely some mornings that are too much for these gloves as temperature’s dip into the teens, but I still bring them along for the ride home when it is slightly warmer. The sizing is on the smaller side, so I would try them on if possible. If that is not a possibility, then size up if you are on the line between sizes. Giro makes quality cycling products, and this is no exception. If you need a pair of waterproof and windproof gloves this winter for temperatures down around freezing, I would take a look. At $70 these are fairly priced in my opinion. As always, your mileage may vary.

Pros

  • Waterproof and windproof
  • Reflective elements
  • Good dexterity
  • Soft and bacteria resistant inner fleece

Cons

  • Moisture can build up inside
  • Remove with care as liner can pull out of fingers
  • Velcro can be finicky to close

About the author

I am an avid runner, cyclist, swimmer, hiker, climber, skier and many other activities that would make this list too long. I started Your Mileage May Vary Reviews in Early 2011 to combine two of my passions: sports and gear.

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